Category Archives: National Issues

A Soldier’s Soldier ~ the toughest man on the longest day

Embedded15600732778271.jpgSomething you don’t often hear about D-day –

Brigadier General Theodore Roosevelt Jr., the son of President “Teddy” Roosevelt, was the oldest man to hit the beach on the D-day invasion. He was also the highest ranking person to directly participate in the beach landing invasion. He was supposed to be with the other command staff in England. Gen. Roosevelt knew the importance of the mission, he knew much of the invasion force were new, untried soldiers who had never seen combat. His requests to join his men were repeatedly denied, but he persisted, even when his superiors told him he faced near certain death.

He was granted permission after explaining how his presence would inspire confidence in the invasion plan. The Commander of the Allied Forces, General Eisenhower wrote Roosevelt’s eulogy before the invasion.

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The Tenth Amendment is Always the Right Answer

I’ve been told that law students prepping for the Bar Exam are told that if the Tenth Amendment is ever among the answers on a multiple-choice question, they can immediately rule it out.

Future lawyers are told the Tenth Amendment is never the “right” answer.

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The Secret Life of Mitt-y Romney

 (Win McNamee/Getty Images)
(Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Pierre Delecto stood alone on the burning deck. Smoke rose from the boards, and the ship was sinking. He grabbed the fallen Stars and Stripes, holding it in his beautiful, shapely teeth, and began climbing the rigging. “Be prudent!” the steward yelled. “Pierre, no!” But Pierre was throwing caution to the wind. “Pierre, oui!” he shouted. His strategy was confrontation, verging on spinefulness.

“… Not so fast,” Donald Trump said.

“Hmm?” said Mitt Romney. He blinked across the white tablecloth. For a moment, he did not know where he was. Trump’s mushy, wheedling voice had startled him. Pierre’s defiant shout over the creaking of the burning ship receded and was replaced by ambient jazz and the sound of clinking cutlery.

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Clarence Thomas and the Lost Constitution

Myron Magnet
Author, Clarence Thomas and the Lost Constitution


Myron MagnetMyron Magnet is editor-at-large of City Journal, where he served as editor from 1994 to 2007. He earned an M.A. from Cambridge University and a Ph.D. from Columbia University, where he also taught for several years. A 2008 recipient of the National Humanities Medal, he has written for numerous publications, including Commentary, The Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times. He is the author of several books, including The Founders at Home: The Building of America, 1735-1817 and, most recently, Clarence Thomas and the Lost Constitution.


The following is adapted from a speech delivered on September 17, 2019, at Hillsdale College’s Constitution Day Celebration in Washington, D.C.

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The Armed Citizen

NRA/American Rifleman, October, 2019

Read these amazing stories which highlight accounts of law-abiding gun owners in America using their Second Amendment rights for self-defense in this online edition of the Armed Citizen®.

September, 2019 –

An armed robber was shot dead by a 22-year-old man early in the morning on Detroit’s West side. Two men on foot reportedly approached three people, seated inside a vehicle, from behind and attempted to rob them. One robber, armed with a gun, allegedly assaulted the driver and demanded items. The 22-year-old drew his concealed-carry firearm and shot the robber multiple times. The man died at the scene from his injuries. The other man allegedly fled. (detroitnews.com, Detroit, Mich., 8/8/19)

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Why the Right to Bear Arms Is an Individual Right

THE DAILY SIGNAL, Jarrett Stepman 

Does the Second Amendment protect an individual right to gun ownership, or is it a collective right that can and should be heavily regulated by the state?

In light of recent debates about mass shootings and gun control, that argument—which has been at the heart of many conversations about gun control—was fleshed out by Sens. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Chris Murphy, D-Conn.

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Why Socialism, and Why Now?

“Socialist!” is no longer a McCarthyite slur.

Rather, the fresh celebrity “Squad” of newly elected identity-politics congresswomen – Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.) and Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) — often either claim to be socialists or embrace socialist ideas. A recent Harris poll showed that about half of so-called millennials would like to live in a socialist country.

Five years ago, septuagenarian Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-Vt.) was considered an irrelevant lone socialist in the U.S. Senate — Vermont’s trademark contribution to cranky quirkiness. But in 2016, Sanders’ improbable Democratic primary run almost knocked off front-runner Hillary Clinton, even as socialist governments were either imploding or stagnating the world over.

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Answers to Common Questions About ‘Red Flag’ Gun Laws

THE DAILY SIGNAL, Amy Swearer / /

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The national gun control conversation often sounds like a broken record, with the same advocates resorting to the same talking points about decades-old proposals, such as banning so-called assault weapons or imposing universal background checks.

But, as we noted in our recent article “Answering Common Gun-Related Questions After Recent Shootings in El Paso and Dayton,” the latest tragedies have added some new, complex layers to the mix—layers that are not always easy to parse through in the midst of all of the background noise.

One of those added layers is the focus on “red flag” laws, also known as “extreme-risk protection orders” or gun violence restraining orders.

What are these laws? What do they accomplish that existing laws don’t already do? What concerns should law-abiding Americans have about them?

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Skillet’s John Cooper on Apostasy Among Young Christian Leaders

From COGENT CHRISTIANITY

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by George Brahm

John Cooper, lead singer for the rock band Skillet, responded to the litany of recent apostasies among young Christian leaders. In a Facebook post titled ‘What in God’s Name is Happening in Christianity?’ put up on Tuesday, August 13, Cooper directly addressed the reasons given by Hillsong songwriter Marty Sampson for renouncing his Christian faith, before highlighting the need for Christians to stay grounded in a truth-driven faith over an emotion-driven one. Here is the text of the post in its entirety (not corrected for spelling or punctuation):

“Ok I’m saying it. Because it’s too important not to.

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If Medicare Is for All, Why Not Chevrolets for All?

THE DAILY SIGNAL, by Elad Vaida / /

“Why do we think it would be ridiculous for the government to mandate which cars we must drive, but not which health insurance plans we must choose?” writes Elad Vaida. (Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

America suffers from a grave societal ill that somehow has been totally ignored.

As debate rages about health care (among other hot-button issues), no one is discussing a very alarming statistic: As of 2015, nearly 10% of U.S. households didn’t have a car.

That’s a severe problem, because affordable transportation is a basic human right, and not an issue for car companies to profit from greedily.

Millions of Americans are living without cars, and the only way to remedy that is by implementing a national, government-funded “Chevrolets for All” plan that would put a Chevy in the garage, driveway, or parking lot of every single adult American.

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