Category Archives: National Issues

Climate Scientist Says Global Warming Not Among the ‘Real Problems’ Behind California Wildfires

A firefighter keeps watching the wildfire burning near a freeway in Simi Valley, California, on Nov. 12. (Photo: Chine Nouvelle/SIPA/Newscom)

Despite what Democratic California Gov. Jerry Brown and environmentalists say, man-made global warming is not a big factor in the wildfires raging across California, according to a veteran climate scientist.

University of Washington climate scientist Cliff Mass, no skeptic of global warming, said blaming California’s deadliest wildfire on a changing climate “has little grounding in fact or science.”

“Global warming is a profoundly serious threat to mankind, but it has little impact [on] the Camp Fire and many of the coastal California fires of the past few years,” Mass wrote on his blog Tuesday.

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The Return of the $4 Billion Electricity Tax

TPPF, By Bill Peacock|November 16, 2018
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Most people don’t like to compete.

Athletes sometimes doctor their equipment to gain an edge in winning their games. Politicians gerrymander their districts rather than compete with their opponents for votes.

In the case of businesses, many of them go to the government get more profits from taxpayers than they could by competing for consumers. This is happening in the Texas electricity market today.

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Federal renewable energy subsidies reduce reliability, hinder the market

By Cutter González|November 2, 2018   
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The coming year could be a watershed moment for energy policy in the United States. The infamous Production Tax Credit (PTC), a federal subsidy for renewable energy, is set to expire, marking a potential step toward more reliable energy, a freer market and a change in the energy production landscape for the better — should we allow it.

The PTC is a $24-per-megawatt-hour credit based on production rather than demand. That means those who produce renewable energy can receive the credit regardless of whether or not that electricity is actually needed. The incentive is so immense that at peak hours of output, wind producers can actually pay retail electric providers, the companies that deliver the energy to homes and businesses, to take their product.

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Yes, Democrats, It’s a Mob

The Daily SignalDavid Harsanyi / /

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder addresses the Human Rights Campaign dinner in Washington, D.C., Sept. 15, 2018. (Photo: Yuri Gripas/Reuters/Newscom)

Former Attorney General Eric Holder believes that Michelle Obama was wrong when she famously advised, “When they go low, we go high.” Rather, he told Democrats at a gathering in Georgia, “When they go low, we kick them.”

If Holder had been honest, he would have said, “When they win a presidency via the constitutionally mandated route and the duly elected president nominates a Supreme Court justice with a 12-year exceptional record on the bench and then the duly elected Senate follows all the rules and precedents set by Democrats—offering numerous hearings and investigations along the way—and confirms that nominee, we kick them, because we’re frustrated.”

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How ‘Diversity Ideology’ Killed the University and Is Infecting America

(Photo: Erik Mcgregor/Zuma Press/Newscom)  

When we think of institutions that shape our nation’s future, many often think of Congress and the White House, but it was John Maynard Keynes, the British economist, who said that a great deal of the change we see in politics and in society at large actually starts with professors, academics, people he called “scribblers a few years back.” Heather Mac Donald is the Thomas W. Smith fellow at the Manhattan Institute and author of the new book “The Diversity Delusion: How Race and Gender Pandering Corrupt the University and Undermine Our Culture”–and someone who’s been studying and writing about that very thing. This is a transcript of an interview on the Sept. 20 episode of The Daily Signal podcast. It was edited for length, style, and clarity.

Daniel Davis: Heather, a typical observer these days who maybe has been around the United States for a couple decades sees a lot of disturbing changes in recent years: new pushes for identity politics, new racial tension, battles over diversity.

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Who were the first six Supreme Court justices?

Constitution Daily, by NCC Staff, February 1, 2018

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It was on this day in 1790 that the United States Supreme Court opened for business. The court back then bared little resemblance to the current one, but it certainly had some interesting characters.

The original six, and not nine justices, included a Chief Justice who became the most-hated man in America for a time; a justice who didn’t want to the serve despite the Senate’s confirmation; and another justice who literally jumped into Charleston Bay when he lost his seat on the bench.

The first business of the First Congress was to establish a law setting up the Supreme Court. The framers had made provisions for the court in Article III, Section 1, of the Constitution, but it took the Judiciary Act of 1789 to make the court a reality.

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Gun Talk Saves a Hero’s Life

The American Rifleman, by Frank Miniter – Tuesday, September 11, 2018 

Greg Stube doesn’t remember what he said when, in the throes of battle—he just asked someone, anyone, on his A-Team of Green Berets to take out the Taliban fighter shooting at him from behind. But he knows that what happened next changed him forever. Later, after being grievously wounded, and as he struggled to stay conscious, and therefore alive, he does remember what he said and why it matters to him to this day. Finally, in the effort to get up from what was almost his deathbed, he learned something even more profound from a few decisive conversations.

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The Armed Citizen

From The American Rifleman, by NRA Staff – Monday, September 3, 2018

The Armed Citizen® September 3, 2018

Why would a stranger break into a home and start beating a pre-teen? Perhaps the better question is what did he expect to happen afterward? A man in South Carolina discovered the answer to the second question the hard way. The boy’s father, hearing a commotion in the middle of the night, entered his son’s bedroom with a gun at the ready. The armed citizen held the intruder at gunpoint until the authorities, alerted to the break-in by a security system, arrived. The intruder appeared to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs—which could well be an answer to the first question. (wach.com, Columbia, SC, 5/29/18)

The Armed Citizen® Extra
A woman was sitting on her front porch smoking a cigarette around 1 a.m. when two men, claiming to be from the DEA, rushed her, tried to handcuff her and held a gun to her head. The woman screamed for her mother, who was asleep upstairs with three children. When the mother came downstairs, one of the intruders pointed a gun at her too. When the two men tried to drag the younger woman out of the house, her brother, who lives next door, came to the rescue. One of the armed men shot the brother, hitting him in the neck, but the brother returned fire striking one of the intruders, killing him. The remaining attacker dragged his accomplice to the porch, then left him and ran from the scene. He is still being sought on multiple charges. The brother was taken to a hospital where he is expected to recover. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Alquippa, PA, 7/18/18)

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Vetting Kavanaugh According to the Constitution

Did Trump Really Save America From Socialism?

The American Spectator, Steve Baldwin, August 16, 2018, 12:05 am