Weatherford’s bond proposal – good idea or bad idea

“If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn’t thinking.”

– General George S. Patton

 

Parker County Courthouse(09)Weatherford’s conceptual downtown plan -

When I consider the wisdom in voting for the bond proposal to spend $16.5 million, my first question is – why?

Haven’t we been told since the Parker County 2008 transportation bond program, that the loop around Weatherford will all but eliminate transportation problems for Weatherford – that the loop would divert through traffic around Weatherford?

Terry Hughes, Weatherford’s Director of Transportation and Public Works wants to “recapture that old, historic feel, and be more pedestrian-friendly”.

Really? .… $16.5 million to make down town Weatherford more pedestrian-friendly?

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Officials move to keep Dallas health workers home

by JAMIE STENGLE
, 10/16/14 -

AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez

AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez

DALLAS (AP) — Texas officials moved for the first time Thursday to force health care workers who had contact with a dying Ebola patient to stay home, reversing course after a nurse later diagnosed with the disease flew across the Midwest and deepened anxiety about whether the virus would spread in the U.S.

Seventy-five Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas employees who had contact with Thomas Eric Duncan were asked to sign legal documents in which they agreed not go to public places or use mass transit, according to Judge Clay Jenkins, top administrator for Dallas County.

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Proposition 1: Good idea or bad idea?

WOW…Aren’t we lucky in Texas to have all this ‘free money’ in our “Rainy Day Fund”?rainy day

Whenever we have a pet project (important or not) that we cannot get funded through the legislative process, we can always propose a Constitutional amendment to raid the Economic Stabilization Fund (aka “Rainy Day Fund”).

What’s that you say??? It’s not free money?

Are you suggesting it is a Constitutionally protected pool of excess tax revenue that is set aside for true emergencies and natural disasters?

Everyone I know agrees on the importance of issues like water, transportation, education …. If the solutions to these and other important issues was simple, there would be no concern or disagreement. If the question however, is how do we fund these programs, my instincts tell me the Economic Stabilization Fund may not be the answer.

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Serious disagreements remain in U.S.-led coalition battling the Islamic State

From the Washington Post 10/14/14 - 

Turkish Lt. Gen. Erdal Ozturk, second from left, and others listen as President Obama speaks during a meeting with more than 20 foreign defense ministers Tuesday at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland. (Evan Vucci/AP)

Turkish Lt. Gen. Erdal Ozturk, second from left, and others listen as President Obama speaks during a meeting with more than 20 foreign defense ministers Tuesday at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland. (Evan Vucci/AP)

Two months after the start of its campaign against the Islamic State, the U.S.-led coalition conducting operations in Iraq and Syria has expanded significantly but remains beset by lingering strategic differences that threaten to undermine the fight.

The Obama administration has emphasized the breadth of the coalition it has assembled to combat the militant group, including the participation of five Arab countries that have played a supporting role in the campaign of airstrikes in Syria. But serious disagreements remain, particularly over the coalition’s plan for Syria and whether the fight against Islamic State militants there will strengthen or weaken Syrian ruler Bashar al-Assad in the long run.

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For Second Time, High School Forced to Reverse Ban on Christian Student Group

From The Daily Signal, by Gabriella Morrongiello, 10/12/14 – 

faith-1  

High school students in Long Island, N.Y., were recently denied the right to establish a club for Christian students by their school administrators. This marks the second time they’ve run into trouble.

Last year, John Raney, a 17-year-old student at Ward Melville High School, created Students United in Faith as an extracurricular club where Christian and non-Christian students could come together to discuss faith and pursue hunger-relief charity projects.

“I wanted to start the club because I thought it would provide a safe space for Christians to meet and talk about their faith,” Raney told Fox News.

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Radiologists use MRIs to find biomarker for Alzheimer’s disease

 

From The LA Times, , 10/07/14 -

MRI scans show perfusion -- the penetration of blood into brain tissue -- which declined in patients who went on to develop cognitive deficits. (Radiological Society of North America)

MRI scans show perfusion — the penetration of blood into brain tissue — which declined in patients who went on to develop cognitive deficits. (Radiological Society of North America)

A brain imaging technique that uses no radiation and no contrast agent appears to detect the earliest signs of impending cognitive decline in the elderly, a new study says.

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Accountability in Education: Who is responsible

 

Mexican Consulate comes to Wisconsin, ensures the Hispanic vote matters

 

As Wisconsin’s Hispanic community becomes a major portion of the voting population, the Mexican Consulate is looking to make their Chicago-based office mobile.

In an effort to increase access to adequate voting documentation, the Consulate’s mobile office coming to Wisconsin, will provide passport renewal services for potential voters, mainly the Latino population. The increasing need has led to Walker’s proposed permanent consulate to replace the monthly mobile consulate visit.

Salvador Carranza, senior academic planner at the University of Wisconsin System, said the Latino population has grown a substantial amount since 2008, and a majority of the population was born here and will have more voting power.

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Homeowners and the Texas Property Tax

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To study the report, go to – Homeowners and Texas Property Tax
 

 

The History and Danger of Administrative Law

From Imprimis – the free monthly speech digest of Hillsdale College

by Phillip Hamburger, September, 2014 -

imprimis

The following is adapted from a speech delivered on May 6, 2014, at Hillsdale College’s Allan P. Kirby, Jr. Center for Constitutional Studies and Citizenship in Washington, D.C., as part of the AWC Family Foundation Lecture Series. 

There are many complaints about administrative law—including that it is arbitrary, that it is a burden on the economy, and that it is an intrusion on freedom. The question I will address here is whether administrative law is unlawful, and I will focus on constitutional history. Those who forget history, it is often said, are doomed to repeat it. And this is what has happened in the United States with the rise of administrative law—or, more accurately, administrative power.

Administrative law is commonly defended as a new sort of power, a product of the 19th and the 20th centuries that developed to deal with the problems of modern society in all its complexity. From this perspective, the Framers of the Constitution could not have anticipated it and the Constitution could not have barred it. What I will suggest, in contrast, is that administrative power is actually very old. It revives what used to be called prerogative or absolute power, and it is thus something that the Constitution centrally prohibited.

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